tillicoultry.org.uk
A ClacksNet Community Site

a view of tillicoultry

Tillicoultry.org.uk is a guide to the town of Tillicoultry in Clackmannanshire, Central Scotland

Voted Rural Community Gateway's website of the month for January 2006

 

Help restore Tillicoultry Clock Tower

The CFSLA Payroll Lottery

The Register of Electors


map of the area around Tillicoultry

Click here for a larger image

Nestling at the foot of the Ochil Hills, Tillicoultry used to be famous for it's knitwear and textile industry. However times change and all the woollen mills have closed - Patons, Hewitts, the Clock Mill to name but a few

Daiglen still manufacture tartan but they are the sole surviving textile firm.

Despite this change of fortune in the manufacturing industry Tillicoultry has continued to grow with new housing appearing behind the Primary School, behind the Harviestoun Inn out the Dollar Road and behind Balcarres Street, next to the Fire Station.

Tillicoultry is well placed for commuting to all areas of Central Scotland with both Glasgow and Edinburgh within an hour's drive.

We hope you will enjoy visiting our site. If you belong to an organisation or group in Tillicoultry not mentioned in the site then please contact us and we will be happy to include your details.

We hope the site will become a useful source of information about Tillicoultry for residents past and present and that groups will send us details of any special events they would like to publicise.

If you have any memories or stories about Tillicoultry please e mail them to us and we would be happy to post them on our Tillicoultry Memory Board

a view of Tillicoultry from the Deil's Chair©The Trustees of the National Museums of Scotland

(copies of this postcard may only be made with the written consent of the National Museums of Scotland)

This postcard, a view of Tillicoultry from the Deil's Chair was sent by a soldier whose battalion was billeted near Tillicoultry in 1917. The X towards the top left hand corner of the card shows where they were. At this time during World War 1 the British Army was so large that units were stationed all over the country. Those not fighting were recovering, training and organising supplies for the men at the front.

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